Chaflán charm

29 Nov
copyright: Lisette van de Graaf

A charming  chaflán

Today I am sharing some chaflán charm with you. Every intersection in the Eixample area of Barcelona is characterised by its chamfered corners, or chaflanes as these are called in Spanish. On one such chaflán I recently ‘discovered’ the very lovely building I am showing you today. You can find it on the intersection of Carrer València with Carrer Bailen. A little off the beaten track perhaps, but it’s just up the road from the lovely temple I showed you not long ago, so well worth heading out for.

copyright: Lisette van de Graaf

Pretty balconies and decorative elements

Just look at the profusion of details and decorative elements that were applied to this residential building! There is no doubt it was constructed in the time when Modernisme was the trend du jour in Barcelona.

copyright: Lisette van de Graaf

Scalloped windows

The different materials used, as well as the symbolism of these and the style are evidence of that…

copyright: Lisette van de Graaf

Four leaf clover

copyright: Lisette van de Graaf

Very fetching, those windows

Lovely, isn’t it?

copyright: Lisette van de Graaf

Pointy clover?

copyright: Lisette van de Graaf

Lovely sgraffito

Did you notice the pretty hearts, camouflaged among the fronds of the leafy sgraffito? And the flies?!

copyright: Lisette van de Graaf

Glazed brick inlay

It looks like steel was used to reinforce the outer structure of the bay windows, but at the same time it helps differentiate the different decorative elements. I love how the glazed green bricks, prettily detailed in themselves appear to be tucked in on a whim. From afar they look just like a green line, but up close is when you can appreciate that they are more than just that. Delightful!

copyright: Lisette van de Graaf

Brick trickery and crest

Last but not least, the underside of the bay windows which are slightly arched, in true Catalan style, were also decorated, with hand-painted glazed tiles. The same that were used as backing for the pointy clover decoration (scroll up a bit), but cut to smaller pieces in order to follow the shape of the curves. The tiles used for the four leaf clover (further up) depict the Swedish crown, a common element and frequently used at the time. No spot missed, on this building! Full of chaflán charm.

copyright: Lisette van de Graaf

Tiled balcony base

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